Sunday, May 1, 2011

Selenium, Brazil Nuts and Testosterone

There seems to be a lot out in the popular press or online material that incresing selenium intake will increase a healthy man's testosterone production (example and example II from Forbes Magazine: what were they thinking?), but little, if anything, in the scientific literature to support that idea. (I like the scientificky approach used by that website, especially the graph that shows no effect, and no indication of variability in the data points). However, elevated testosterone, long term, will increase risk of testicular and prostate cancer. There has also been recent emphasis on consumption of brazil nuts as a natural source of selenium that will boost testosterone and increase virility.

Selenium is protective against prostate cancer, and good for testicular development (fetal period . . . sorry guys) and possibly protective against other oxidative-stress-induced ailments, testicular or not. On the other hand, selenium, at high concentrations can result in DNA damage, and thus increase risk of cancer. The problem with supplementing, either through tablets, or through consumption of a natural product high in selenium, is that we do not know where the lines of good and evil cross.

As for Brazil nuts, selenium concentrations in any plant should be dependent on the concentration of selenium in the soil in which it grows, therefore, the concentration of selenium in Brazil nuts probably varies. This turns out to be the case, with nuts grown in Manaus-Belem more than ten times higher in selenium than those grown in Acre-Rondia. Someone consuming Brazil nuts may or may not be making a significant increase in selenium intake.
Chang, J. (1995). Selenium content of Brazil nuts from two geographic locations in Brazil Chemosphere, 30 (4), 801-802 DOI: 10.1016/0045-6535(94)00409-N

ATIF, F., YOUSUF, S., & AGRAWAL, S. (2008). Restraint stress-induced oxidative damage and its amelioration with selenium European Journal of Pharmacology, 600 (1-3), 59-63 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.09.029

Brozmanová J, Mániková D, Vlčková V, & Chovanec M (2010). Selenium: a double-edged sword for defense and offence in cancer. Archives of toxicology, 84 (12), 919-38 PMID: 20871980
Henderson, B. (2000). Hormonal carcinogenesis Carcinogenesis, 21 (3), 427-433 DOI: 10.1093/carcin/21.3.427

3 comments:

  1. I would be that is you click psorisisfood there will be some website promoting something of questionable value.

    ReplyDelete
  2. maggie.danhakl@healthline.comJuly 31, 2014 at 11:27 AM

    Hi,

    Healthline just designed a virtual guide explaining how testosterone affects the body. You can see the infographic here: http://www.healthline.com/health/low-testosterone/effects-on-body

    This is valuable med-reviewed information that can help a man understand how affects multiple parts of their bodies and the side effects that occur from having low testosterone. I thought this would be of interest to your audience, and I’m writing to see if you would include this as a resource on your page: http://hmunca.blogspot.com/2011/05/selenium-brazil-nuts-and-testosterone.html

    If you do not believe this would be a good fit for a resource on your site, even sharing this on your social communities would be a great alternative to help get the word out.

    Thanks so much for taking the time to review. Please let me know your thoughts and if I can answer any questions for you.

    All the best,
    Maggie Danhakl • Assistant Marketing Manager
    p: 415-281-3124 f: 415-281-3199

    Healthline • The Power of Intelligent Health
    660 Third Street, San Francisco, CA 94107
    www.healthline.com | @Healthline | @HealthlineCorp

    About Us: corp.healthline.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Excellent information on your blog, thank you for taking the time to share with us. Amazing insight you have on this, it's nice to find a website that details so much information about different artists. buy spartagen xt online

    ReplyDelete